About the New York Center for Jungian Studies

Founded in 1991 by Aryeh Maidenbaum and Diana Rubin, the New York Center for Jungian Studies offers seminars and study tours in extraordinary settings. Each year, the Center presents a spring program in Ireland, a Jung on the Hudson summer seminar, and a study tour abroad. Accompanied by outstanding and internationally recognized analysts and authors, we take great pride in creating unique and meaningful content that provides insight into the concepts of C.G. Jung and how we may better understand ourselves and our world by drawing on these ideas. Additionally, our programs offer a rare opportunity for participants to meet and exchange ideas with others who come from diverse backgrounds, yet who all have a common interest in the psychology and ideas of Carl Jung.

In a world fraught with dissension and anxiety, our programs are designed to be a respite from daily life and a journey inward to deepen our Individuation process. Our seminars and study tours provide an ideal setting to stretch ourselves psychologically, learn how to better balance spirit and matter, and mine the depths of our inner Self. When we can respect the power of the unconscious and look beyond causality and effect, we are able to further our potential for individuation and growth.

New York Center for Jungian Studies’ programs are open to individuals of all fields as well as mental health professionals; participants hail from all over the U.S., Canada and abroad. A combination of inspired content, magical settings, superb accommodations, and gourmet meals provide an unforgettable experience and a unique and meaningful learning vacation. Continuing education credits are offered for mental health professionals.

The Center's Codirectors

Aryeh Maidenbaum, Ph.D., Jungian analyst, is co-director of the New York Center for Jungian Studies; editor and contributor to the book Jung and the Shadow of Anti-Semitism, and co-editor, with Stephen Martin, of Lingering Shadows: Jungians, Freudians, and Anti-Semitism. Among his other publications are “The Search for Spirit in Jungian Psychology,” “Sounds of Silence,” and “Psychological Type, Job Change and Personal Growth.” Dr. Maidenbaum was formerly on the faculty of NYU, where he taught courses on Jungian psychology. He lectures and leads workshops internationally and organizes and leads educational Jewish heritage travel programs throughout the world. He is currently writing a book on aspects of Judaism through a Jungian lens.

Diana Rubin, LCSW, is codirector of the New York Center for Jungian Studies. She is in private practice in New York City and New Paltz, in the Hudson Valley, where she specializes in working with creative and performing artists. A staff psychotherapist at the Postgraduate Center’s Institute for the Performing Artist for many years, she has organized and led Jungian seminars and study tours for more than 25 years on topics related to Jung, creativity, and the arts. 

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