July 19–24, 2020

July 24–25, 2020

Live online format. 

Easy online registration for one or both events.

For the past twenty-six years, those who have attended our programs know how carefully we prepare to make sure we provide participants with a valuable and enriching learning experience. This year, an unprecedented time that we have never experienced, we are offering our 27th annual Jung on the Hudson Summer Seminars online, via Zoom conferencing.

As always, we have put a great deal of care into meeting the need for high level quality content and have designed our format accordingly. By continuing our twenty-six year tradition of gathering together outstanding Jungian analysts and authors, we are confident that, albeit through an online learning format, we are still offering participants the unique opportunity to explore their common interest in the psychology of C.G. Jung while experiencing how these ideas may be of help in their personal and professional lives.

An additional bonus, if you cannot join each and every segment of the program, or would like to listen again to a particular segment, replay videos of any or all of the presentations will be available for a full week following the program.

We hope you will join us and enjoy a meaningful respite from the health crisis we have been experiencing this year, and we look forward to resuming our in-person Seminar in 2021.

Schedule and Tuition

Register for one or both programs. Entire program can be viewed again for one week following the event.

Summer Seminar Series: Letting Go, Letting In, Letting Be
Sunday, July 19, 6:00–7:30 p.m. ET, keynote presentation: Dr. James Hollis
Monday—Friday, July 20–24: meet daily from 12:00–3:30 p.m. ET with a 30 minute break
Tuition: $345*

A Mini Weekend with James Hollis
Friday evening, July 24: 6:00-7:30 p.m. ET and Saturday, July 25;  12:00- 1:30 p.m. & 2:00- 3:30 p.m. ET
Tuition: $125*

Register for both programs and save $50.

*Tuition cost prior to June 30, 2020. After June 30 the Seminar Series tuition is $395 and A Mini Weekend with James Hollis is $150.

Continuing Education Credits available
CE credits are available for both programs at an additional cost of $50 per certificate: 12 CE credits for the Summer Seminar Series: Letting Go, Letting In, Letting Be and 4.5 CE credits for A Mini Weekend with James Hollis. Find details here.

Certificates of attendance are available at a cost of $10 per certificate for those who do not require Continuing Education Credits

Letting Go, Letting In, Letting Be

July 19–24

There is much ado about letting go—of thoughts that lead us astray, relationships that no longer serve us, things that have outlived their usefulness, work that drains us of our vitality, emotions that hinder us, control over the details of our lives, or childhood baggage that we spend years analyzing. Or it may be letting go of a phase of our life, positive things that have served us well, or work that has been fulfilling until now in order to expand the possibilities and grow into our potential.

But why do we find it so difficult to let go? Why do we resist expunging when—by this very act—we may free ourselves from unnecessary burdens that prevent us from actualizing our very essence and our ultimate selves? Is it fear of loss or fear of succeeding? Will we find ourselves "less than" should we find the courage to let go? Or will the very act of release open up the space for us to glimpse the greater possibilities in ourselves, a liberation of spirit, a reconnection to soul? Letting go is learning to live with ambiguity, learning to live with the unknown. And it is just this kind of space where we might encounter our undiscovered Self, perhaps the one we have been seeking all along. Letting go can mean freedom.

During this week-long seminar, through a combination of presentations led by outstanding analysts and authors, we will explore the dynamics at work in this dilemma that we all experience at some point in our lives and in the lives of our friends, our patients, and our families.

Letting Go - Rumi | nyjungcenter.org

Presentations

Those who have attended our programs know how carefully we prepare the daily schedules and itineraries to provide a valuable and enriching experience. This year our live online format, via Zoom, will provide the opportunity to hear from a notable and outstanding faculty. We are confident that participants will find the material meaningful and personally enriching.

Sunday Evening, July 19  | 6:00–7:30 p.m. ET
Keynote Presentation
JAMES HOLLIS
Reframing our Sense of Self and World in Plague Time

Our personal and collective encounter with an invisible antagonist, our enforced sequestering, our interrupted activities, our removal from familiar points of reference occasion both anxiety and fear in us.   How are we to understand this experience psychologically, move from a sense of victimage to personal agency, and find enlargement in times of diminishment.

James Hollis, Ph.D., is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst with a practice in Washington DC., where he is also executive director of the Jung Society of Washington. He is the author of 16 books that have been translated into 18 languages. An internationally acclaimed analyst, Dr. Hollis is former executive director of the Jung Educational Center of Houston, professor of Jungian Studies at Saybrook University, and vice president emeritus of the Philemon Foundation. His books include The Eden Project: In Search of the Magical Other; Finding Meaning in the Second Half of Life; Living a More Considered Life; The Middle Passage; Hauntings: Dispelling the Ghosts Who Run Our Lives; Mythologems: What Matters Most; Living an Examined Life: Wisdom for the Second Half of the Journey; and Living Between Worlds: Finding Personal Resilience in Changing Times.

Monday, July 20 | 12:00–1:30 & 2:00–3:30 p.m. ET
JANIS MAXWELL
The Inner Call: The Music of Our Lives

One aspect of the process of individuation is ‘letting go’ of beliefs that no longer serve life’s purpose. The journey that we call ‘individuation’ typically starts with a call or a descent, which is a necessary choice of our conscious will. How do we relinquish old cherished beliefs or attitudes in order to allow the new to emerge?

C.G. Jung discovered late in life that music has a power to harmonize psychic energies and reach the deep archetypal material that can only sometimes be reached in our analytical work. In her presentation Janis Maxwell will encourage us to experience music as a pato a deeper understanding of the individuation process and the inner call. 

Janis M. Maxwell, Ph.D. is a training analyst and member of the faculty of the C.G. Jung Institute in Zürich, where she is involved in training analysts to use music in their practice. She has served as President and Director of Training of the Philadelphia Jung Institute as well as Director of Training for the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts.

Tuesday, July 21  |  12:00 –1:30  & 2:00–3:30 p.m. ET
MORGAN STEBBINS
Letting Go and Diving Deep 

Letting-Go is half of an alchemical, archetypal duality called Letting Go and Diving Deep. One loosens that which is too bound, the other reconnects distant aspects. But how do we know which is which and when is the right time? Drawing from both Zen literature and Jungian alchemical tradition, Dr. Stebbins will guide participants in listening to the dialogue of the soul using a mindful discernment called amplification to generate a symbolic understanding of the psyche. Finally, we will learn to ground these insights which give us the inclination of the Self, so that we know what our tasks are in this life.

Morgan Stebbins, M.Div, LMSW, D.Min, LP is a supervising analyst, faculty member, and former President and Director of Training at the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association in New York, where he also maintains a private practice. Holding a doctorate in Religious Studies and Hermeneutics, he began his Zen training at the San Francisco Zen Center where he was also a monastic resident. He has written on symbol formation, dreams, the role of mindfulness in analysis, the meaning of compulsion, and the archetypal psychology of Buddhist sutras and precepts.

Wednesday, July 22  |  12:00–1:30  & 2:00–3:30 p.m. ET
ANN BELFORD ULANOV
Building and Letting Go Defenses

“Letting go, letting in, Letting be” can't happen without attention to what we refer to as “Projection” – in Jungian terms,  ascribing “aspects of our own unconscious qualities to others as if the others are really what we imagine them to be.” It is as basic to the psyche as breathing is to the body. We  cannot “let go” if we do not take into account the projections which bind us to the “Other.” Nevertheless, while these projections are first and in the way of our own psychological development and Individuation process, “letting be” does not mean getting rid of all projections; they are natural to us. We are created as image making creatures and create worlds through what we project.
Both Freud and Jung saw  that projections of our deep emotions of fear, and desire of love and aggression of soul and body, have ceased to be directed to the heavens and the God of various religions. They fell out of the heavens. Where did all that energy go, and with it the soul life at the core of us? It fell into the human beings we are; indeed, Jung called himself a "Doctor of Soul."  In this presentation, Dr. Ann Ulanov will explore six meanings of projection-  drawing on other psychoanalytic theorists and following a line of Jung's thought through all of them.

Ann Belford Ulanov, M.Div, Ph.D. is an internationally known and practicing Jungian analyst in New York City; Professor Emerita of Psychology and Religion at Union Theological Seminary; and lecturer in the U.S. and abroad. She is the author of many books including Spiritual Aspects of Clinical Work; The Female Ancestors of Christ; Madness & Creativity; and The Psychoid, Soul and Psyche: Piercing Space/Time Barriers as well as with her late husband, Barry Ulanov, The Healing Imagination; and Transforming Sexuality: The Archetypal World of Anima and Animus.

Thursday, July 23  |  12:00–1:30  & 2:00–3:30 p.m. ET
SUSAN TIBERGHIEN
Rekindling the Soul, Imagining a New Tomorrow

We must be able to let things happen in the psyche. —C.G. Jung
Imagination is more important than knowledge. —Albert Einstein

In 1913 C.G. Jung wrote in The Red Book that he had lost his soul. Have we, over a century later, lost our soul? Might we listen anew as he calls, “My soul where are you?”  Holding on to her hand, Jung journeys in the dark, in the world of imagination. He learns to relinquish intentions and cultivate his “garden with modesty.” He has overreached himself, he is covered “by endless proliferation.” Is this a lesson for today as the global pandemic threatens our lives, our very earth?

In this presentation we will first consider how both soul and imagination were viewed over the centuries with excerpts from Plato, Ibn Arabi, Meister Eckhart, Henri Corbin, and C.G. Jung. It is Corbin who writes that the kingdom of the soul is an “interworld” between matter and spirit, between the visible and the invisible. We will look at how Jung developed the practice of active imagination which he saw as “the equivalent of the alchemical operation.” We will go into our own darkness and burn away the proliferation. We will wash away the impurities. In letting go, we will be free to imagine a new tomorrow. 

Susan M. Tiberghien living in Geneva, Switzerland, has been teaching Jungian writing workshops for twenty-five years in Europe and the USA. With a degree in Philosophy and English and graduate studies at the Université de Grenoble and the C.G. Jung Institute in Küsnacht, she has authored seven books, including Looking for Gold; Writing Toward Wholeness; and Circling to the Center. She recently recorded master classes for the Jung Society of Washington as well as a series of webinars for the International Women’s Writing Guild.

Friday, July 24  |  12:00–1:30 & 2:00–3:30 p.m. ET
GARY ASTRACHAN
Dionysos LysiosLoosening into Being

Loosening, unweaving, dissolving, coming apart, letting go... These are the processes of analysis, psycho-ana-lysis, the 'disentangling, release and liberation of soul.' As much as analysis is an actively performative doing with words, it is in its furthest reach, essentially a not-doing, an allowance, opening and falling into the deep. Like artistic creation, the work of individuation achieves its ultimate goal only by not being there yet. Following the thread of Dionysos Lysios, the 'Loosener,' we shall together attempt to learn how to embrace the necessity of attending to the current crisis and catastrophe of a disturbed world order without, while simultaneously furthering the inner journey into deeper realms of soul.

Gary D. Astrachan, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist and Jungian psychoanalyst in private practice in Portland, Maine. He is a faculty member and supervising and training analyst at the C.G. Jung Institutes in Boston and in Switzerland, and he lectures and teaches widely throughout North America, Latin America, and Europe. A founding member of the C.G. Jung Center of Brunswick, Maine, he is the author of numerous scholarly articles in professional journals and books. His most recent book is Naming the Gods: Cy Twombly’s Passionate Poiesis.

A Mini Weekend with James Hollis
July 24–25, 2020

Friday, July 24 | 6:00–7:30 p.m. ET
Archetypal Patterns in Daily Life 

We are the symbol making animal. The concept of the archetype—which Jung added to our vocabulary—at first seems mysterious but explains how the human psyche imposes on the raw chaos of daily experience patterns which allow us to make psychic process conscious, and to experience nature’s flux and flow in meaningful ways. As such, archetypes provide continuity to our experience, and link us to our ancestors and our common heritage. 

In this presentation, participants will learn how the psyche expresses itself through symbolic forms, be able to discern the role that symbolic forms play in connecting humans to each other, appreciate the role of image as carrier of unconscious purpose, and for clinicians, be able to link the client to energies larger than the concerns of daily life. 

 


Saturday, July 25 | 12:00–1:30  & 2:00–3:30 p.m. ET
What We Can Still Learn from Jung, or Need to Remember 

This morning, Dr. Hollis will focus on some of the ideas central to Jung’s observations on the human condition. Both challenging and helpful, puzzling and clarifying—all of them take us deeper and grant us greater agency into this “short pause between two great mysteries” of which he spoke. Participants will gain insights into the forms of psychological healing, be able to utilize the wisdom of Jung in linking clients to healing agencies within, learn how psychological maturation occurs, differentiate the effect of fate, character, and individual effort on psychological growth, and finally, appreciate the constructive role symptoms play in psychological healing and maturation. 

James Hollis, Ph.D., is a Zürich-trained Jungian analyst with a practice in Washington DC., where he is also executive director of the Jung Society of Washington. He is the author of 16 books that have been translated into 18 languages. An internationally acclaimed analyst, Dr. Hollis is former executive director of the Jung Educational Center of Houston, professor of Jungian Studies at Saybrook University, and vice president emeritus of the Philemon Foundation. His books include The Eden Project: In Search of the Magical Other; Finding Meaning in the Second Half of Life; Living a More Considered Life; The Middle Passage; Hauntings: Dispelling the Ghosts Who Run Our Lives; Mythologems: What Matters Most; Living an Examined Life: Wisdom for the Second Half of the Journey; and Living Between Worlds: Finding Personal Resilience in Changing Times.

 

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